North Dakota Hunting and Fishing — 2013
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Fishing

Anglers will find choices in every season, from snagging paddlefish on the Missouri and Yellowstone rivers in the spring in northwestern North Dakota to drilling a hole in the ice at Devils Lake in a winter search for jumbo yellow perch. The Missouri River system (including lakes Sakakawea and Oahe), Devils Lake, and the Red River are some of the major fisheries. Like other lakes and rivers in North Dakota, each offers unique experiences.

The Missouri River system slices through west and central North Dakota and features four distinct areas that provide their own characteristics and fishing qualities: upper Missouri River, Lake Sakakawea, central Missouri River and Lake Oahe.

The Upper Missouri River
The Missouri River enters North Dakota from Montana just west of Williston.

The free-flowing river offers a good setting for sauger and walleye in the spring and fall. And at the western reaches of the river in North Dakota, anglers can find one of the better spots in the country to snag a giant paddle- fish in late spring. They also can come across northern pike and catfish in this area.

Lake Sakakawea
The lake, named for the Native American woman who joined Lewis and Clark 200 years ago, is the third-largest manmade lake in the United States. It’s filled by the Missouri River and con- tained by Garrison Dam, the country’s fifth largest. This huge lake, which features more shoreline than the state of California, is home to numeroustypes of fish. Walleye is the most popular catch, but anglers can reel in northern pike weighing more than 20 pounds, Chinook salmon, smallmouth bass, white bass, yellow perch, crappie and sauger.

Central Missouri River
Water leaving Garrison Dam flows south in the Missouri River until it reaches Lake Oahe beyond Bismarck. This stretch of river is home to nationally renowned walleye fishing. The Tailrace at Garrison Dam offers excellent open-water fishing year-round and is home to state records for Chinook salmon, brown trout, rainbow trout, lake trout and cutthroat trout, all caught within 20 miles downstream of the dam.

Lake Oahe
This lake stretches from Pierre, S.D., nearly to Bismarck. Anglers can find walleye and northern pike in this area, but there’s also crappie, catfish and white bass.

Lake Sakakawea
Fishing guide Terry Focke of Pick City has been around Lake Sakakawea long enough to know the ins and outs of fishing the big water and the Missouri River below Garrison Dam. He’s seen high water and low, and he sees positive things coming from the recent fluctuations brought on by flooding and drought.
“When you have low-water years, it’s easier to catch because there isn’t so much area,” Focke said of the lake with more shoreline than the California coast. “The last few years have had poor is kept stable.” Other than the bite, stability isn’t a trait of Lake Sakakawea. The lake is always adjusting,with elevation, temperatures or weather. Focke, who has guided on the lake for 20 years and owns Terry’s Guide Service, said fishing generally follows the progression of warming water from west (shallower) to east (deeper).
“The warmer it gets, the deeper they go,” Focke said. “Ninety percent of the fish are caught on spinners or bottom bouncers or crankbaits. Early in the year, jigs seem to work. “This year is the best salmon season I’ve seen in 20 years,” added Focke, who credited stocking during high-water years.”
Focke said the river below the dam has been a big producer of nice fish, but there has been some adjustments following the flood of 2011.
Fishing is phenomenal on the river,” Focke said. “You can just about always catch fish (rainbow and brown trout, catfish, drum and even sturgeon) and you never know what you have till you get it in. The only thing different I’ve seen is more sand in places. The fish seem to be in different spots.”

Lake Oahe
Fishing guide Brian Fettig of Bismarck has been on Lake Oahe long enough to know a great thing when he sees it. And he sees greatness in the lake that stretches from Pierre, S.D., to within casting distance of the Bismarck-Mandan area. “Lake Oahe is arguably one of the best fisheries in the nation,” said Fettig, who owns Lake Oahe Guides. “The fishery changes with the scenery.”
And that changes dramatically from the tree-lined Missouri River near Bismarck and Mandan where it forms Lake Oahe to the vast lake between the nearly barren hills near the South Dakota border.
The diversity of species and tactics is part of the allure, Fettig said.
Within 20 or 30 miles, the river becomes a lake and it’s completely different,” Fettig said. “And it changes with the seasons. In the spring you might be jigging in the Bismarck area. As the season moves on, fish move down to the lake and you use more crankbaits. But you do it all on the same body of water.”
Most anglers consider the northern reaches of Lake Oahe to be the Kimball Bottom
area south of Bismarck. Professionals like those in the FLW and PWT have returned over and over to the area because of its excellent fishing.
Walleye are their target, of course. But weekend anglers can also run into northern pike, white bass, smallmouth bass and more. “A little bit of everything,” as Fettig says.
In winter, Fettig advises anglers to head south a ways to an area where the current isn’t so strong for ice fishing. “We go mostly from Beaver Bay south to the state line,” he said. And for those wondering what affect 2011’s flooding had, Fettig hasn’t seen much at all. “It looks like it hasn’t hurt (the fishing),” Fettig said. “The river runs a little different, but it’s a lot of the same thing. It doesn’t seem like it affected it a lot.”

Following is a list of boating access sites on the Missouri River System in
North Dakota. All sites have a boat ramp, courtesy dock and restrooms unless
otherwise noted. Check the North managing authority noted at the end of
each listing.

1. SUNDHEIM PARK – 2 miles west of
Cartwright on ND Highway 200, on
west side of Yellowstone River and
shelter – Sundheim Park Board.
2. CONFLUENCE AREA – 1.5 miles
south of Buford on ND Highway 1804.
Paved access road, developed and
primitive camping, security lights, picnic
shelter – Williams County WRD.
3. LEWIS AND CLARK BRIDGE – 4
miles west of Williston on U.S. Highway
2, 3 miles south on U.S. Highway 85,
on south side of Missouri River, and
east side of U.S. Highway 85. Paved
access road, no courtesy docks,
primitive camping, security lights, picnic
shelter – Williams County WRD.
4. AMERICAN LEGION PARK
(RAUMS) – 4 miles west of Williston
on U.S. Highway 2, 6 miles south on
U.S. Highway 85, then 4 miles east.
Gravel access road,
northwest of New Town on ND Highway
1804, then 2 miles south, 1 mile
east, 3 miles south, 3 miles east.
Gravel access road, fish cleaning
facility, developed and primitive
camping, security lights, picnic shelter,
concession, telephone, RV dump station
– Mountrail County Park Board.
10. SANISH BAY (AFTEM) – 1 mile
north, 2 miles west of New Town.
Gravel access road, no restrooms –
New Town Park Board/Aftem
Development.
11. NEW TOWN MARINA – 2 miles
west of New Town on ND Highway 23.
Paved access road, fish cleaning facility,
developed and primitive camping, security
lights, picnic shelter, concession,
Missouri River System
Boating Access
Dakota Game and Fish Department’s
website (gf.nd.gov) for updated access
information or contact the appropriate
south side of ND Highway 200. Paved
access road, no courtesy docks,
primitive camping, security lights, picnic
5. LEWIS AND CLARK STATE PARK –
16 miles east of Williston on ND
Highway 1804, then 3 miles south.
Paved access road, fish cleaning
facility, developed and primitive
camping, security lights, picnic
shelter, concession, lodging, access fee,
telephone, RV dump station – North
Dakota Parks and Recreation.
6. WHITETAIL BAY (LUND’S LANDING)
– 22 miles east of Williston on ND
Highway 1804. Paved access road, fish
cleaning facility, developed camping,
security lights, picnic shelter,
concession, lodging, boat rental –
Williams County WRD.
7. TOBACCO GARDEN CREEK BAY – 2
miles east of Watford City on ND
Highway 23, then 25 miles north and
east on ND Highway 1806. Paved
access road, fish cleaning facility,
developed and primitive camping, security
lights, picnic shelter, concession,
lodging, RV dump station – McKenzie
County Park Board.
8. LITTLE BEAVER BAY – 32 miles
northwest of New Town on ND Highway
1804, then 3 miles south. Gravel
access road, fish cleaning facility, developed
and primitive camping, security
lights, picnic shelter – Williams County
WRD.
9. WHITE EARTH BAY – 28 miles
telephone, RV dump station – New
Town Marina Association.
12. FOUR BEARS – 4 miles west of
New Town on ND Highway 23. Paved
access road, fish cleaning facility,
developed and primitive camping, security
lights, picnic shelter, concession,
lodging, telephone, RV dump station –
Three Affiliated Tribes.
13. POUCH POINT – 7 miles south, 2
miles east, 2 miles south, 1 mile east,
3 miles south of New Town. Paved
access road, developed and primitive
camping, security lights, picnic shelter,
concession – Three Affiliated Tribes.
14. LITTLEFIELD BAY – 5 miles south,
2 miles east of New Town. Gravel access
road, no restrooms, no courtesy
docks, primitive camping – North Dakota
Game and Fish Department.
15. VAN HOOK – 5 miles east of New
Town on ND Highway 23, then 2 miles
south. Paved access road, fish cleaning
facility, developed and primitive
camping, security lights, picnic shelter,
concession, telephone, RV dump station
– Mountrail County Park Board.
16. PARSHALL BAY – 3 miles west, 1
mile south, 3 miles west, 1 mile south,
2 miles west of Parshall. Paved access
road, fish cleaning facility, developed
and primitive camping, security lights,
picnic shelter, concession, boat rental,
telephone, RV dump station – Mountrail
County Park Board.
17. SKUNK BAY – 14 miles northeast
of Mandaree. Gravel access road, developed
and primitive camping, concession,
lodging – Three Affiliated Tribes/
Roads Maker, Inc.
18. DEEP WATER CREEK BAY – 14
miles south of Parshall on ND Highway
37, then either 1 mile south to the
corps ramp or 2.5 miles west and .5
miles south to the county ramp. Gravel
access road, primitive camping, security
lights, picnic shelter – U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers/McLean County Park
Board.
19. HALE MARINA – 18 miles southeast
of Mandaree. Gravel access road,
no restrooms, no courtesy docks –
Three Affiliated Tribes.
20. MCKENZIE BAY – 22 miles southeast
of Mandaree. Gravel access road,
fish cleaning facility, developed and
primitive camping, security lights, picnic
shelter, concession, lodging, telephone,
RV dump station – Watford City Park
Board.
21. LITTLE MISSOURI BAY – 16 miles
northeast of Dunn Center. Gravel
access road, security lights – Dunn
County.
22. CHARGING EAGLE BAY – 12 miles
north of Halliday on ND Highway 8,
then 10 miles west on BIA No. 22.
Gravel access road, no restrooms, fish
cleaning facility, primitive camping.
Three Affiliated Tribes.
23. INDIAN HILLS RESORT – 11 miles
west of White Shield on ND Highway
1804, then 3 miles south. Gravel access
road, fish cleaning facility, developed
and primitive camping, security
lights, picnic shelter, concession,
lodging, boat rental, telephone, RV
dump station – North Dakota Parks and
Recreation/Three Affiliated Tribes.
24. BEAVER CREEK BAY – 12 miles
north of Zap. Paved access road, primitive
camping, picnic shelter – Zap City
Park Board.
25. DAKOTA WATERS RESORT – 15
miles north of Beulah. Paved access
road, fish cleaning facility, developed
and primitive camping, security lights,
picnic shelter, concession, lodging, boat
rental, telephone, RV dump station –
Dakota Waters Resort.
26. BEULAH BAY – 17 miles north of
Beulah. Paved access road, fish cleaning
facility, developed and primitive
camping, security lights, picnic shelter,
lodging, telephone, RV dump station –
Beulah City Park Board.
27. DOUGLAS CREEK BAY – 5 miles
south, 4 miles east of Emmet to corps
ramp or 2 miles south, 1 mile east, 1
mile south of Emmet to county ramp.
Gravel access road, primitive camping –
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers/McLean
County Park Board.
28. CAMP OF THE CROSS – 4 miles
west, 1.5 miles south, 1 mile west, 1
mile south, 1 mile west, .5 miles south
of Garrison. Gravel access road, no
restrooms, primitive camping – Camp
of the Cross.
29. HAZEN BAY – 14 miles north of
Hazen. Paved access road, fish cleaning
facility, developed and primitive camping,
security lights, picnic shelter, concession,
lodging, telephone, RV dump
station – Hazen City Park Board.
30. LAKE SAKAKAWEA STATE PARK
– Just east and north of Pick City.
Paved access road, fish cleaning facility,
developed and primitive camping,
security lights, picnic shelter, concession,
lodging, boat rental, access fee,
telephone, RV dump station – North
Dakota Parks and Recreation.
31. GARRISON CREEK – 2 miles west
of Garrison on ND Highway 37, 3 miles
south, 1 mile east. Gravel access road,
no restrooms – Garrison Cabin Association.
32. FORT STEVENSON STATE PARK –
3 miles south of Garrison. Paved access
road, fish cleaning facility, developed
and primitive camping, security lights,
picnic shelter, concession, lodging,
boat rental, access fee, telephone, RV
dump station – North Dakota Parks and
Recreation.
33. STEINKE BAY – 3 miles west of
the junction of ND Highway 37 and
U.S. Highway 83, then 2 miles south.
Gravel access road, primitive camping –
McLean County Park Board.
34. SPORTSMENS CENTENNIAL
PARK – 1 mile west of the junction of
ND Highway 37 and U.S. Highway 83,
then 2 miles south, 1 mile west. Gravel
access road, fish cleaning facility, developed
and primitive camping, security
lights, picnic shelter, concession, telephone
– McLean County Park Board.
35. WEST TOTTEN TRAIL – 7 miles
north of Coleharbor on U.S. Highway
83, then .5 miles west, or 2 miles
south of the junction of U.S. Highway
83 and ND Highway 37, then .5 miles
west. Gravel access road – McLean
County Park Board.
36. WOLF CREEK – 1 mile east of
Riverdale on ND Highway 200, then 2
miles north, 1 mile east, 1 mile north,
.5 miles east. Gravel access road, fish
cleaning facility, primitive camping,
security lights, picnic shelter, RV dump
station – U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
37. GOVERNMENT BAY – Just north of
Riverdale. Paved access road, fish
cleaning facility, developed and
primitive camping, security lights – U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers.
38. GARRISON DAM TAILRACE –
Directly below Garrison Dam with
the campground located south of the
fish hatchery. Paved access road, fish
cleaning facility, developed camping,
security lights – U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers.
39. UPA SITE (STANTON) – Just west
of UPA power plant on ND Highway
200A near Stanton. Paved access road,
security lights – city of Stanton.
40. WASHBURN – On east side of
Missouri River near Washburn, north of
ND Highway 200A bridge. Paved access
road, fish cleaning facility, primitive
camping, security lights, picnic shelter,
RV dump station – Washburn City Park
Board.
41. SANGER (CROSS RANCH) – Just
east of Sanger townsite on west side
of Missouri River. Gravel access road,
primitive camping, picnic shelter –
North Dakota Parks and Recreation.
42. STECKEL BOAT LANDING (WILTON)
– 22 miles north of Bismarck on
ND Highway 1804, or 5.5 miles west,
1 mile south, and 1.5 miles west of
junction of U.S. Highway 83 and ND
Highway 36. Paved access road,
primitive camping, picnic shelter, trash
receptacles – Burleigh County Park
Board.
43. HOGE LANDING – On east side of
Missouri River near Bismarck, 6.4 miles
north of I-94 bridge on River Road,
then .7 miles west and 1.5 miles south/
southwest. Gravel access road, no
courtesy docks, picnic shelter – Bismarck
Parks and Recreation.
44. KNIEFEL LANDING – On east side
of the Missouri River near Bismarck,
3 miles north of I-94 bridge on River
Road, then 1 mile west. Paved access
road, security lights, picnic shelter,
concession – Burleigh County Park
Board.
45. GRANT MARSH BRIDGE – On east
side of Missouri River near Bismarck,
south side of the I-94 bridge on River
Road. Paved access road, security lights
– Bismarck Parks and Recreation.
46. FOX ISLAND PARK – From
Washington Street, .75 miles west on
Riverwood Drive (1 block south of Expressway),
1.5 miles south and .5 miles
west. Heavy pleasure boat use in
summer. Paved access road, fish cleaning
facility, security lights – Bismarck
Parks and Recreation.
47. LITTLE HEART BOTTOMS
(SCHMIDT) – 11 miles south of Mandan
on ND Highway 1806, then 1 mile
north. Paved access road – Morton
County Park Board.
48. KIMBALL BOTTOMS (DESERT) – 8
miles south of Bismarck on ND Highway
1804, then 2 miles south. Paved
access road, primitive camping, security
lights, picnic shelter – Burleigh County
Park Board.
49. GRANER BOTTOMS (SUGAR
LOAF) – 19 miles south of Mandan on
ND Highway 1806, then 1 mile east, or
about 3 miles north of Huff. Paved access
road, fish cleaning facility, developed
and primitive camping, security
lights, picnic shelter, RV dump station
– Morton County Park Board.
50. MACLEAN BOTTOMS (GUN
RANGE) – 14 miles south of Bismarck
on ND Highway 1804, then 2 miles
south. Paved access road, primitive
camping, security lights, picnic shelter –
Burleigh County Park Board.
51. HAZELTON – 31 miles southeast of
Bismarck on ND Highway 1804 or 13
miles west and 2 miles north of Hazelton.
Campground located just south of
boat ramp. Paved access road, developed
and primitive camping, security
lights, picnic shelter – U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers.
52. FORT RICE – 28 miles south of
Mandan on ND Highway 1806, then
.5 miles east. Paved access road, fish
cleaning facility, primitive camping,
security lights, picnic shelter – Morton
County Park Board.
53. WALKER BOTTOMS (PRAIRIE
KNIGHTS MARINA) – 10 miles south
of the Cannonball River on ND Highway
1806, then 3.5 miles east. Gravel access
road, fish cleaning facility, developed
and primitive camping, security
lights, picnic shelter, lodging, telephone,
RV dump station – Prairie
Knights Casino.
54. BEAVER BAY – 13 miles west of
Linton on ND Highway 13, then 2 miles
south on ND Highway 1804. Paved access
road, fish cleaning facility, developed
and primitive camping, security
lights, picnic shelter, concession, telephone,
RV dump station – U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers.
55. CATTAIL BAY (WINONA) – 10
miles west of Strasburg, 1 mile south,
7 miles west, then 1 mile north on ND
Highway 1804, 2 miles west, 2 miles
south, 1 mile west. Gravel access road,
primitive camping, concession – U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers.
56. FORT YATES – North edge of Fort
Yates. Paved access road, primitive
camping, picnic shelter – Standing Rock
Sioux Tribe.
57. LANGELIERS BAY – 10 miles west
of Strasburg, 1 mile south, 7 miles
west, then 11 miles south on ND Highway
1804, and .75 miles west. Paved
access road, fish cleaning facility, primitive
camping, security lights – Emmons
County Park Board.

Best Bass Water Bets
Some smallmouth bass waters in North Dakota where an angler stands a good
chance of catching a nice, hard-fighting fish:

• Lake Ashtabula – 10 miles north of
Valley City.
• Lake Audubon – North of
Coleharbor.
• Blacktail Dam – 5 miles north, 5
miles west, 1 mile north of the junction
of U.S. highways 2 and 85.
• Bowman-Haley Dam – 11 miles
south, 8 miles east, 2 miles south of
Bowman.
• Lake Darling – 16 miles north, 13
miles west of Minot.
• Lake Elsie – 1 mile south, 1.5 miles
west of Hankinson.
• Fish Creek Dam – 8 miles south,
2 miles east, 1 mile south of I-94 Exit
134.
• GDU Canal Lakes – 9 miles south,
3 miles east and west of Mercer.
• Heart Butte Reservoir (Lake
Tschida) – 15 miles south of Glen Ullin.
• Hiddenwood Lake – 8 miles south
of Makoti.
• Indian Creek Dam – 1.5 miles west,
2 miles south, 2 miles west, 3 miles
south of Regent.
• Jamestown Reservoir – 2 miles
north of Jamestown.
• Kota-Ray Dam – 5 miles south, .5
miles east, 2 miles south of Ray.
• McClusky Canal – Central part of
state in McLean, Burleigh and Sheridan
counties.
• Missouri River – Near Riverdale to
south of Bismarck.
• North Lemmon – 5 miles north of
Lemmon, South Dakota.
• Raleigh Reservoir – 3.5 miles west,
.25 miles south of Raleigh.
• Lake Sakakawea – From New Town
to Riverdale.
• Sheep Creek Dam – 4 miles south,
.5 miles west of Elgin.
• Sheyenne River – Southeastern part
of state.
• Spiritwood Lake – 10 miles north, 4
miles east of Jamestown.
- Compiled by North Dakota Game
and Fish Department
Pembina River

REGULATION HIGHLIGHTS
• State law now requires that all
water is drained from boats and other
watercraft when leaving a water body.
• On nearly all North Dakota waters,
fishing for game fish is open year-round,
with a licensing season of April 1-March
31. Exceptions include a few small
lakes designated as Special Fish
Management Areas.
• Darkhouse spearfishing is allowed
from December 1 through March 15
of each fishing year on designated
lakes. Northern pike and nongame
fish are the only legal species. Daily
and possession limits are the same as
for hook-and-line angling. Darkhouse
spearfishing is open to North Dakota
residents, as well as nonresidents
whose home states allow North Dakotans
to spearfish. Darkhouse spearfishing
requires registration with the North
Dakota Game and Fish Department.
• Fathead and stickleback minnows,
creek chubs and white suckers (limited
area on the Red River only) are the
only legal live baitfish allowed in North
Dakota waters. On the following lakes,
no live baitfish of any kind are allowed:
• Nonresidents under age 16 do not
need a fishing license if accompanied
by a licensed adult.
DAILY/POSSESSION LIMITS
Copies of the current North Dakota fishing
regulations are available at gf.nd.gov or by
calling the Game and Fish Department
at 701-328-6300.
NONRESIDENT FISHING
Individual Season................................$35.00
Husband-Wife Season..........................45.00
Individual 10-day..................................25.00
Individual 3-day.....................................15.00
Paddlefish Tag (limit 1—all ages)............7.50
RESIDENT FISHING
Individual
(age 16 or older).................................$10.00
Husband and Wife.................................14.00
Senior Citizen (age 65 and older)...........3.00
Paddlefish Tag (limit 1 - all ages)...........3.00
Water Area County
Belfield Pond Stark
Blumhardt Dam McIntosh
Bylin Dam/Dougherty Dam Walsh
Camels Hump Dam Golden Valley
Crown Butte Morton
Custer Mine Pond McLean
Davis Dam Slope
Dickinson Dike Stark
Fish Creek Morton
Harmon Lake Morton
Indian Creek Hettinger
Kettle Lake Williams
Leland Dam McKenzie
Lightning Lake Mclean
McDowell Dam Burleigh
North Lemmon Dam Adams
Nygren Dam Morton
Raleigh Reservoir Grant
Sather Dam McKenzie
Sheep Creek Dam Grant
Velva Sportsmen's Pond Ward

Devils Lake
There is more than one way to fish for walleye on Devils Lake. That’s what makes this ever-expanding fishery unique, according to guide and television personality Jason Mitchell.“Devils Lake is changing all the time,” said Mitchell, who owns Mitchell’s Guide Service and stars in the Jason Mitchell Outdoors television show. “It’s always different and that keeps it fun.
It’s fun to catch (fish), but it’s fun to learn about them and how to fish for them.” Devils Lake is certainly changing and anglers find the lake challenging and rewarding due to the species within its waters and ways that they can drop a line. “What separates Devils Lake from anywhere else is that you can catch fish in so many areas doing so many different things,” Mitchell said. “In a lot of lakes, if you don’t fish a certain way you’ll be in trouble. On Devils Lake you catch them from shore along the rip rap or tie up or head out to deep water.”
That includes those who don’t have a boat. “This is, by far, the best area I’ve even seen for good shore fishing,” Mitchell said.
Regardless of your reason for being on the water, Devils Lake has what you’re
looking for. “This is one of the best places in the country for numbers of pike if you just want lots of action,” Mitchell said. “It’s getting better and better for big pike, like 20 pounds or bigger, too. You also get tremendous action with white bass.” Mitchell said Devils Lake is unlike many lakes and rivers in that there is no real slow season. “On Devils Lake, fishing is incredible all year. The fishery doesn’t shut down like it does in a lot of places. The bite could actually get better later on.” When winter sets in, the focus turns to ice fishing. Devils Lake is home to the Perch Express, which brings people to Devils Lake by train to spend several days landing the popular panfish.
Jason Mitchell
www.jasonmitchelloutdoors.com

Devils Lake
Devils Lake Ramps
1. ROUND LAKE BAY – 3 miles south of Minnewaukan on
U.S. Highway 281. Paved access road – Minnewaukan
Community Club.
2. PELICAN LAKE BAY – 15 miles west of Devils Lake on ND
Highway 19. Paved access road, no restrooms – Devils Lake
Access Committee.
3. GRAHAMS ISLAND STATE PARK – 10 miles west of Devils
Lake on ND Highway 19, then 6 miles south. Paved access
road, fish cleaning facility, developed and primitive camping,
security lights, picnic shelter, concession, lodging, access fee,
telephone, RV dump station – ND Parks and Recreation.
4. SCHWAB LANDING – 7 miles west of Devils Lake on ND
Highway 19. Paved access road, fish cleaning facility, developed
and primitive camping, security lights, picnic shelter,
concession – Devils Lake Access Committee.
5. HENEGAR LANDING – 1 mile west of Devils Lake on ND
Highway 19, then .75 miles south. Paved access road,
fish cleaning facility, security lights – City of Devils Lake.
6. CREEL BAY – 3 miles south of Devils Lake on ND Highway
20, then 2 miles west and .25 miles north. Paved access road,
fish cleaning facility, developed and primitive camping, security
lights, picnic shelter – Devils Lake Access Committee.
7. SPIRIT LAKE CASINO – 6 miles south of Devils Lake on
ND Highway 20/57. Paved access road, fish cleaning facility,
developed and primitive camping, security lights, concession,
lodging, boat rental, telephone, RV dump station – Spirit Lake
Casino.
8. EAST BAY – 3 miles south of Devils Lake on ND Highway
20. Paved access road, security lights – Devils Lake Access
Committee.
9. ESTENSON LANDING (BLACK TIGER BAY) – 15 miles
south of Devils Lake on ND Highway 20. Paved access road,
no restrooms – Devils Lake Access Committee.
10. TOLNA LANDING (STUMP LAKE) – 3 miles north of
Tolna. Gravel access road, no restrooms – Tolna Community
Club.
11. STUMP LAKE PARK – 11 miles south, 1 mile west of Lakota.
Gravel access road, fish cleaning facility, developed and
primitive camping, security lights, picnic shelter, concession,
lodging, RV dump station – Nelson County Park Board.

Red River of the North
Fishing guide Brad Durick knew he had to adapt his strategy to continue fishing the Red River of the North. The deep water and fast current told him everything about the river that separates Minnesota and North Dakota.
“It used to be predictable, but not anymore,” said Durick, who owns Brad Durick Outdoors LLC and has guided anglers to trophy catfish in the Red River since 2008. “The past two years have been up and down so much, there’s no normality to it.” As the river rose to high levels and stayed there, Durick decided it was time for him and his guides to learn the nuances of fishing in deeper water.
“Last year we said we have to learn to fish in high water until they shut us
down (during dangerous flooding),” Durick said. “I prefer it high.”
Durick said he found that during high flows and deep water, catfish tend
to leave the channel for calmer waters. “They don’t like the current, either.
They try to find holes in the channel and get out of the main channel. Once
we learned that, everything came together.” Now Durick has strategies for almost everything, he said. The catfish bite generally runs from the time ramps open in spring until October. “It’s a good time to be on the Red,” Durick said. “Even the old-timers say it hasn’t been this good in a long time.” Catfish is what most anglers chase on the Red River, though other species can be found there, Durick said.


The winding Red River of the North forms the boundary between Minnesota and North Dakota, but it creates one long recreational playground for citizens of both states. The river provides canoeing, boating and fishing opportunities yearround, although spring floods sometimes create hazardous conditions before the river returns to its normal, slow, meandering flow in to Canada.
Local anglers may know the best access points to the Red River. For those who are unsure, the North Dakota Game and Fish has online maps that detail access points along the length of the river. Check with the Game and Fish Department
for updated access maps.

North Dakota Fishing Waters
The following public fishing waters in North Dakota are listed by county in the six districts managed by the Game and Fish Department. The number in parenthesis that follows each fishery is simply a code used by biologists to help identify those waters. The codes are also found on the maps to help readers locate waters in which they are interested. Primary fish species present in the lake are noted. Most state public fishing waters have boat ramps. Waters without ramps are listed as “no ramp.” Check signs at each area for further restrictions.

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